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Memphis. A city of infamy, known by many for its reputation as badlands. One regularly touted as one of the most dangerous cities in America. From a wide lens, it appears as a city riddled with crime, inundated in poverty, and poor in repute. Look no further than Memphis’ oft ranked position as “The Poorest Metropolitan City in America.” These are many of the reasons that I said goodbye. When I left, I declared to family and friends that I was finished with Memphis. I emphasized that the city and I would never reconcile. Fast forward 10 years, and I realize that Memphis was not finished with me.

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I love the lights!

Let me say, I’ve always had a complicated relationship with my hometown. It is a relationship filled with years of memories with family and friends. It was also a relationship where the good was mostly shadowed by traumatic events in my life while growing up in Memphis. Events that would long be etched into our history together and would keep me at arm’s length. Visits with those family and friends became less regular, and when I was present in body, I was absent in mind. I stopped paying attention to the city, the emotions as distant as the body. I no longer cared about who would run for Mayor, what would become of old buildings, or the state of current affairs.

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I like this one. The perspective, the colours and the whole atmosphere are just like something taken out of a comic book. Add a small silhouette of a person and I can totally imagine the close up that follows.

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Lovely! It looks like a painting at first glance!

10 years, a few cities, many miles and memories, and a marriage later found me in the Chicagoland area. It was “The Great American City”, and it was “My Kind of Town.” Yes, it was a city of art, a city of experience, a city of people, and a city of endless opportunity it seemed. That came with a price. We found ourselves burdened by the cost of living. Day by day, I saw my spouse’s emotional state spiraling. As much as I loved the Chicago area, I knew my family’s well-being was suffering, and I realized that we needed to act soon. At that moment, I did what I said I couldn’t, I did what I said I wouldn’t. We were going to move back to our hometown: Memphis.

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I’ve been to Beale Street. Fun times. But I’m glad I was in a group. This pic is gorgeous!

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SUCH a coolpic- nice capture, wonder-full find!

When I first got back to the city, I was here but I wasn’t present. I didn’t venture out much. I kept myself occupied by working on the home, creating from old photography work in places from my travels to Chicago, France, Croatia, Japan, etc. For a time, I lacked the drive to go out and capture new photos. This wasn’t because I thought Memphis wasn’t photogenic. Indeed, I had taken thousands upon thousands of photos in the area when I was younger. To boot, my spouse often described a Memphis that I didn’t recognize, their experience clashing with mine. It still existed. There was still that arm’s length between Memphis and I that was built all those years ago. Five months elapsed before motivation came around, and I finally decided to venture off into the city and try to capture photos. The unexpected happened: I got lost.

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I remember this sign. It was used as an example in geometry class, in 1967. 😉

I didn’t recognize my hometown. It was not the city from my past. It was not the Memphis that I had kept at a distance for so long. There had been such a dramatic change. I saw a passionate city, and a growing population of people that realized that it was great and was seizing the opportunity to reestablish Memphis as a popular destination. I saw a city that hadn’t forgotten its past, but it was looking toward its future.

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This looks like from a dystopian movie…

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Looks like something out of a sci-fi movie

This series is an ongoing project that focuses on highlighting those efforts and counters the ongoing narrative of Memphis’ poor repute. It is a city with real problems to be solved, but also a city full of opportunities to be seized and one with so much to enjoy. (Don’t get me started on the public transportation system).

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Perfect Orange & Teal

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so good, wish there was someone at the bar

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Music Alley ❤️ Right by our yoga studio, @yourinneryogi

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🤤 So good.

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would love to know the ISO/Fstop/shutter speed etc

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excellent documentary !!!

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Illuminated, Downtown

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/memphis-photography-anthony-presley/

The story of the American cowboy is so white, which is frustrating for black riders right after the civil war, more than a quarter of cowboys were African American

I shot this on a trail ride with the Delta Hill Riders in Tallahatchie County, Mississippi. The gentleman in the foreground, Joe Wrenn, organises this group ride every fall in the hilly terrain to the north of the Mississippi delta. Ive been going for a few years.

Trail rides are universal in the American cowboy tradition. In other states you might find thousands of people on a single ride. Here there were about 100 people, many riding, and others, who you cant see in the photo, on dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicles.

Most of the delta region is completely flat. Up here, though, are rolling hills, which is where the group gets its name. The ride wasnt following a trail part of it was along an old logging road. We had all stopped for a break. People were relaxing, playing music and then, when we started back out, Joe drove the truck up alongside these three horses. I shot I dont know how many frames. I remember feeling so excited at getting both Joe and the kids on their horses silhouetted against that beautiful, late-afternoon sun bursting through. That is Joes grandson on the first horse.

Elsewhere, I have photographed a great-grandmother who had just turned 92 her husband, now deceased, was one of the first cowboys to start organising these rides in the delta. And Ive photographed little kids, maybe four or five, riding around a horse show.

Being a Delta Hill Rider is like being a member of a biker club. They have been riding horses for generations, and they take great pride in passing down the skills riding, grooming, competing from one generation to the next. The riders go to R&B clubs dressed as cowboys and the DJ will play cowboy songs and zydeco music.

My interest started by chance, in December 2016, when I was working as staff photographer at the university in Cleveland, Mississippi. I stumbled across a small group of riders during the annual parade and asked one of the riders if I could come and photograph where they keep their horses. He was excited that somebody was taking an interest. He invited me to a Black Heritage rodeo, which was happening the following month.

To begin with, I had very minimal knowledge of the deep history of black cowboys. Right after the civil war, more than a quarter of cowboys in the country were African American. But I think even people who have lived in the delta their whole life might not know about this. Mississippi is not really thought of as a cowboy state in the way that Texas or Oklahoma are. Beyond that, though, the story told of what the American cowboy is has been so white its John Wayne, the stoic white man. I know from oral-history interviews Ive started doing with [black] riders that this is frustrating for them. Theirs is a part of history that has been overlooked.

Meeting the Delta Hill Riders has been life-changing. I grew up in Maine, in a place that was not diverse. This was the first time in my life that I developed a deep connection with the African American community. I am really grateful for that. I feel like, if people made the time to get to know neighbours who were different from them, it would relieve a lot of the tension and divisive thinking that we have.

Rory Doyles CV

Rory
Photograph: Christopher P Michel

Born: Maine, 1983.

Trained: Journalism at St Michaels College, Vermont.

Influences: Ron Haviv, Diane Arbus, Alex Webb.

High point: The excitement of getting my first magazine assignment. It was a huge honour to have someone believe in my artistic approach.

Low point: I struggled to find an enjoyable career right out of university, and photojournalism helped me get out of that rut.

Top tip: Never feel as if youre done learning.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/dec/05/rory-doyles-best-photograph-the-black-cowboys-of-tallahatchie

Ready or not, the 20s are coming up, and not the ones you learned about in world history. The 10s (teens?) are moving into the pages of the past, so over the next month, and probably for years to come, we’re going to see everyone from pop culture columnists to historians trying to sum up the theme of the decade. Mari, a 26-year-old book critic, inspired Twitter users to get started reminiscing when she posted a picture of herself at the beginning of the decade vs. now. The thread now has thousands of replies in which people look back on how this decade has changed them.

The largest age group on Twitter is 25-34. A demographic that began the ‘10s as teens or young adults has undoubtedly seen a lot of adult milestones since then, like degrees, career beginnings, and relationships. Next in line is the 18-24 demographic, who have quite literally grown up this decade. It’s no wonder looking at old pictures of a person who hadn’t even experienced most of their formative years yet can bring up strong feelings (you also might notice that the older Twitter users taking part in the challenge are a little more chill about it.)

Here are some posts we liked—scroll down and have a look. Then share your thoughts, what you think of this trend, and how things have changed for you this decade in the comments below!

Twitter users look back on their 10-year-old photos

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But there’s no need to roast your former self, especially if you were a literal child in 2009. Learning to dress yourself isn’t a “glow up”, that’s just growing up. And nobody likes their fashion choices from 10 years ago. Don’t be so hard on yourself!

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Most importantly, don’t let this challenge get you down if you’re not comfortable showing pictures of yourself from 10 years ago, or if you feel like you haven’t achieved much this decade compared to all the people flaunting their lucrative jobs and happy marriages.

2020 isn’t a test—there’s not anything more profound about it than any other year. If all you did was stay alive this decade, that’s awesome. I bet you took some cool photos and listened to a lot of great music. Won’t it be fun to discover even more next year?

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Decades challenge: me traveling to Karlowy Vary in 2009 at 17 vs me traveling to London at 27

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Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/people-decade-transformation-before-after-photo/

Have you ever wondered what Europe looked like before or during the Second World War (WWII)? Take a look at our “before and after” or “then and now” images and see what the war did to the people, the monuments and the landscapes.

Head over to our site for an interactive version of each image and many, many more!

Let us know what you think about the images below in the comments

#1

Avenue Foch (Occupation Of Paris)

On June 14, 1940, troops of the German Wehrmacht occupy Paris. The picture shows the victory parade of the German 30th Infantry Division on the Avenue Foch in front of General Kurt von Briesen 1886-1941.

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Cinema In Żnin During German Occupation

Catholic house transformed by the Germans into a cinema. 1941.

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Burning Peterhof

Burning Peterhof Palace after the Nazi invasion. 1941 September

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Cherbourg-Octeville

The city center and US troops in June 1944. Several US vehicles are parked on the Quai de Caligny west of the rotary bridge.

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Captured German Soldiers At Juno Beach

Captured German Soldiers at Juno Beach shortly before their deportation to England. In the background, the villa “Denise et Roger” can be seen. It is one of the most famous places in the time of D-Day. 1994, June 6th.

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German Prisoners At The Station In Bernières

Captured German soldiers await their transport at the railway station in Bernières-sur-mer. Today, the old station building serves as the tourist office. 1944.

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Place De La Concorde (Liberation Of Paris)

A crowd celebrates the arrival of Allied troops during a victory parade for the liberation of Paris, as suddenly shots from a sniper on one of the roofs are heard. Quickly the Parisians scatter for cover. Although the city was officially abandoned by the Germans, small bands of snipers remained active, which made the victory celebrations risky. 1944, August 29.

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Aachen Rathaus

Southside of the Aachen Town Hall at Katschhof at the end of World War II. The town hall is one of the most important buildings in the historic center of Aachen. It was repeatedly rebuilt and expanded over many centuries. The oldest part of the monument is the Granusturm from the time of Charlemagne. During World War II, the town hall suffered badly from several bombing raids. On 14 July 1943, the roof and both City Hall towers burned out, the steel skeletons of the tower domes bent by the heat dominated the appearance of the town hall for a few years. Rebuilding followed in the 50s; last, the two-tower caps were finished in 1978.

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Notre-Dame (Liberation Of Paris)

Priest 105mm self-propelled guns of the French 2nd Armoured Division in front of Notre Dame in Paris, 26 August 1944. Photo of the Imperial War Museum (IWM).

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Rentforter Straße

Destroyed tram and houses in the Rentforterstrasse in Gladbeck, end of the Second World War. The house with the gabled facade in the background is the main entrance of the St. Barbara hospital. Today there are no more tramways in Gladbeck. 1945.

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Locals Welcome The German Soldiers

In the background is the Assumption Cathedral. 1941.

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Rue St. Placide

August 1944. Since 1940, Paris is occupied by German troops. As the Allied army approaches the capital, this encourages the Parisian population to resist. It comes to a general strike, followed by open revolts. Everywhere in the city (such as here in the rue St. Placide) barricades are erected, and around the 20th of August, the Resistance has taken control of the city. Although militarily inefficient, these barricades had a symbolic character for of the Paris uprising.

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The Dam Busters

In May 1943, the Allies dropped specially developed “bouncing bombs” on select dams in Germany’s industrial heartland. The Möhne dam was the hardest hit and 1600 civilians died in the flooding. The attack was dramatized by The Dam Busters (1955).

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German Soldier In Alkmaar

German soldier in Alkmaar at the Langestraat. 1941.

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Palais Chaillot

Paris in September 1944, shortly after the recapture. To protect against potential German counterattacks, an anti-aircraft gun is provisionally installed by American soldiers in the park of the Palais de Chaillot.

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View From The Castle Of Caen On The Destroyed City

June 1944.

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Hoofdkwartier Wehrmacht

German officers in the headquarters of the Wehrmacht in Huize Voorhout in Alkmaar. 1942.

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Pont Neuf/Quai De Conti (Liberation Of Paris)

Barricade on the Pont Neuf at the intersection with the Quai de Conti, August 1944. Since 1940, Paris had been occupied by German troops. As the Allied army approached the capital, this encouraged the Parisian population to resist. It came to a general strike, followed by open revolts. Everywhere in the city barricades were erected, and around the 20th of August, the Resistance took control of the city. Although militarily inefficient, these barricades had a symbolic character for of the Paris uprising.

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San Lorenzo, Rome

San Lorenzo, Rome after the allied bombing on 19 July 1943.

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San Lorenzo, Rome After The Bombing

San Lorenzo after the bombing in 1943, Princess Marie-José inspecting the damage.

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Siege Of Leningrad

The school building destroyed by the Nazi bombing. 1941.

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Aerial shot of Lodz made at the end of WW2 (1942) compared with Google Earth’s view from 2017.

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Villa Denise Et Roger At Juno Beach

The villa “Denise et Roger” is one of the most famous places of the time of D-Day. The region around Bernières-Sur-Mer was liberated by Canadian soldiers on June 6. 1944.

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Battle Of Rome, Porta San Paolo

September 9th, 1943

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The Battle Of Porta San Paolo, Rome

On 10 September 1943, Porta San Paolo was the scene of the last attempt by the Italian army to avoid the German occupation of Rome On the evening of the 9th, the 21st Infantry Division “Granatieri di Sardegna” moved towards the center, engaging in fierce fighting on the Via Laurentina (Tre Fontane locality), around the Exposition Hill (current EUR district) and Forte Ostiense. The German troops marched on the Via Ostiense, towards the heart of Rome. Despite the overwhelming numerical superiority and armament of the enemy, the walls of Porta San Paolo became a defensive bulwark of resistance, protected by barricades and vehicle carcasses. The grenadiers also fought here with courage, along with the numerous civilians.

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Wehrmacht Soldiers In Schagen

Wehrmacht Soldiers In the city of Schagen in The Netherlands. 1940.

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Alkmaar Mobilization Dutch Soldiers

Mobilization Dutch soldiers before the “Ambachtsschool” in Alkmaar, The Netherlands. 1939

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Horses Bring Food To Civilians Hidden In The Abbey

After parts of the city have been liberated by the Allies, horse carts bring food to those who took refuge in the Abbey of Saint-Étienne. 1944, July 10th.

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Old Bunker Alkmaar Flower Shop

An old bunker is now used as a plant shop. Old Photo is taken in 1945, the new one in 2018.

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Opéra Garnier (Occupation Of Paris)

The Opera Garnier decorated with swastikas for a festival of German music during the Occupation of Paris. The Germans organized a series of concerts in the occupied city, including by the Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by Herbert von Karajan. 1941.

Note: this post originally had 39 images. It’s been shortened to the top 30 images based on user votes.

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/repotography-world-war-ii-europe-lena-weber/

Comic Con New York 2019 has passed, but cosplay never stops. Pictures of cosplayers in their favorite superhero (or supervillain) attire from this year’s NYCC are still surfacing on the Internet.

Ali Reza Malik, a Brooklyn-based photographer, is the artist behind a handful of iconic cosplay photographs from this year’s Comic Con New York. Ali’s work focuses primarily on South Asian communities, exploring the different forms of portraiture with the aim of promoting the visibility of these and other minority communities in the US. He may have taken a short break from his usual work once at Comic Con New York, but his camera had no rest.

Bored Panda got in touch with Ali Reza Malik, who was kind enough to show the Comic Con cosplay scene through the lens of his camera. Read our interview with Ali and vote on your favorite cosplay from NYCC 2019 below.

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Mario, Borderlands-Style Cell Shaded

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Aang & Avatar Korra

Ali traces his photographic roots back to the mid aughts, when he got hooked on art submission websites and blogs: “[This] threw me on the path of design, music, writing, and photography (instead of my major—finance) by force-feeding inspiration for hours on end each day.”

It didn’t stop there. Ali’s passion for all things media was further fostered by a close friend. “It was only further perpetuated by a close friend of mine during that time—a constantly optimistic presence who never left her camera at home, even when we (bitterly) asked her to shelve it for a night,” jokes Ali.

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Yondu

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Mysterio

“I have her to thank mostly, and seeing photography in practice eventually triggered something in me to do the same.” This was enough to inspire ten years (and counting) worth of freelance creative projects and branded work.

When asked what drew Ali to attend Comic Con, he explained: “Comic Con is a haven for all of the interests that I’ve maintained since high school, but never found a community to enjoy them with. Even without hunting down exclusives or attending panels, the simple act of walking through an environment full of constant unadulterated excitement and recognition for every type of fandom makes NYCC feel like home.”

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Landlady From Kung Fu Hustle

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Groot, Gamora & Yondu

“Cosplayers best exemplify the peak of what NYCC offers, not only in terms of dedication but in artistic prowess and creative ingenuity. It’s a judgment-free zone that celebrates instead of competes, and everyone has the chance to feel part of it,” continued Ali.

Finally, we asked Ali to name some of the more memorable cosplays at NYCC: “The standout cosplayer is the obvious choice: Borderlands Mario, created by Akellyz. I caught him in a rare display of widespread awe in the middle of the convention floor, where a tremendously wide and complete circle was formed around him—wider than anything I’d seen at NYCC before.”

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Storm

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Colossus

“I also had the pleasure to shoot a group of cosplayers, all donning a hijab, getting together to portray different Marvel villains with immaculate attention to detail while tweaking the characters to fit each of their individual styles,” carried on Ali.

Of course, Comic Con isn’t only about cosplay. “Outside cosplay, I was lucky enough to be part of a booth run by Omar Mirza of The Last Ansaars, who had his own hectic weekend trying to maintain wild demand for the release of the third issue of his political satire series, The Incapable Trump (@theincapabletrump).”

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Aquawoman

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Captain America

“We’ve been handing out a limited number of issues for free for the past few years, and started seeing them flipped on eBay for upwards of $1,000. Someone even returned this year with their 9.8 CGC copy of the first issue, and it was signed by Stan Lee—that was, by far, the highlight of the weekend,” added Ali.

If you haven’t had your fill of cosplay, continue scrolling to see the rest of Ali’s NYCC experience and check out more Comic Con New York cosplay here provided by Bored Panda. Let us know if we’ve missed any cosplay character names in the comments!

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Newton Scamander

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Him

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Shy Guys

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Captain Jack Sparow

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Venom Bowsette

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Mario & Luigi, Samurais

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Luiji (Luija Board)

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Lara Croft

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Katana & Joker

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Gambit

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Wario

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Cruella De Vil

See Also on Bored Panda

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Scarlet Witch

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Female Pennywise

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Kilmonger & Black Panther

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Princess Zelda

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The Good Fairy

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Princess Leia

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Unknown

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Deadpool

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The Wicked Witch Elphaba

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Alladin, Jasmine, & Jafar

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Samurai Gengi

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Rey

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Jane Foster & Lady Loki

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Space Ghost

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Powerline & Roxanne

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Shy Guys, Domino & Storm

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/comic-con-new-york-2019-ali-reza-malik/

His iconic portraits of James Dean in a wintry New York won him fame. But it was his travels in the west coast that brought out his true genius, as he captured the cracks in the 60s counterculture

For many years California frightened me, Dennis Stock wrote in the preface to California Trip, first published in 1970. For a young man with traditional concerns for spiritual and aesthetic order, California seemed too unreal. I ran.

Stock, a naturally sceptical New Yorker who had served in the US Navy before hustling his way into the ranks of the esteemed Magnum photo agency, had instinctively picked up on the edgy undercurrents of the late 1960s Californian hippy dream. As the idealism of that decade peaked and faded, California became what Stock called a head lab fomenting various radically alternative lifestyles fuelled by eastern mysticism, experiments in communal living, and all kinds of post-LSD mind expansion.

And, as the images in the newly reissued California Trip show, Stocks initial wary incomprehension soon turned to fascination. In time, he came to see California as the frontier for a new kind of society where technological and spiritual quests vibrate intermingling, often creating the ethereal.

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Photograph: Dennis Stock/Magnum Photos

Almost 50 years later, and nine years after his death, California Trip now seems both prophetic and elegiac, Stocks free-flowing approach allowing the contradictions of the time to speak for themselves. There are images of sun-kissed, back-to-nature hippy couples and marching black militants, missile bases and utopian communes, endless Californian beaches and a towering stack of rusting cars in a scrap yard. In one photograph, a tousle-haired infant frolics next to a Hells Angels motorcycle gang member. To Californians, he wrote, this was all so ordinary as to be mundane.

With hindsight, it is clear that California Trip upends our received notion of Dennis Stock, who remains most famous for his intimately observed images of the young James Dean in the months before his death in September 1955. Stock befriended the young Dean after seeing an early screening of East of Edenand subsequently photographed him on the wintry streets of New York and on a trip back to his family home in Fairmount, Indiana. When the ensuing photo essay appeared in Life magazine, it helped cement Deans status as a new kind of film star: moody, intense and ill at ease with the Hollywood fame factory. In the immediate wake of Deans untimely death in a car crash, Stocks images attained an almost mythic aura that remains to this day, arguably overshadowing his other work.

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The icon got in the way … Stocks shot of James Dean, New York, 1955. Photograph: Dennis Stock/Magnum Photos

Dennis was not always happy about the prominence of the James Dean photos, says Hanna Sawka, who directed the illuminating 2011 documentary, Beyond Iconic: Photographer Dennis Stock. He made some quite bitter comments about the pictures, that people werent seeing them as they should because the icon got in the way. Stocks widow, author Susan Richards, who describes him as the most confident person I ever met, recalls that the prominence of the Dean photographs maybe bugged him a little bit, but he also knew that the iconic stature of images enabled him to have the lifestyle he had.

Stock had joined Magnum in 1951 and, the following year, shot an extraordinarily candid series about Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia for Life magazine. Following the success of the Dean series, he began photographing jazz musicians, merging stark, monochrome portraits of the likes of Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong with often dramatic images of their performances.

In a style that was unadorned and intimate, he set about capturing the reality of the nomadic jazz life as well as its drama. In one evocative image, a struggling musician, Bill Crow, lugs a bass across a Manhattan street in what looks like the early hours of the morning. In another, he captures an ecstatic Earl Hines pounding on the piano in a smoky club, the sense of the musics joyous momentum palpable in a single stilled moment.

Against all this, the images in California Trip mark a dramatic departure, though one that had been taking shape in his work throughout the 1960s. The more free-flowing narrative style of Stocks Californian pictures was surely informed by his dalliance with the moving image, which began when he left Magnum in 1968 to focus on documentary film-making. It also speaks of a relentless creative curiosity and open-mindedness that, as Sawkas documentary shows, was not always immediately apparent in his everyday interactions with people.

In the film, as he teaches a photography class, his students often seem overawed by the sheer presence of a man whose opinions tend to be strongly held and forcefully articulated. He was quite a personality, says Sawka, laughing. Sometimes people were offended by him, but the gruffness masked a deep sensitivity and integrity.

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Shadow play Playa Del Rey, LA, 1968. Photograph: Dennis Stock/Magnum Photos

Richards concurs: He took no prisoners. He could be harsh with people, including his friends and, the next moment, the gentlest, sweetest guy. If you didnt know him, he could appear arrogant. Richards, who was his fourth wife I met him when he was older and mellower and not travelling so much puts his combativeness down to a childhood in the Bronx that was marked by poverty and family dysfunction.

His mother was a helpless person, and his father was absent a lot because his job as a house painter required him to travel. [Stock] was raised in a family that moved in the night a lot because they could not pay the rent. He told me that, when he was just seven, he was working odd jobs to support his mother. That kind of experience leaves its mark and I think that, to a degree, he was ashamed of his childhood poverty.

It also made him resilient. He served his photographic apprenticeship with Gjon Mili, an Albanian-born pioneer in movement photography, who once brutally informed Stock he would never be a Life photographer. Dennis did not see that as a bad thing, says Richards. It rolled right off his back. He interpreted it as that he would never fit the mould that Life required which was fine by him.

For all his combativeness, Stock was essentially a liberal New Yorker who was instinctively drawn to the promise of the Californian counterculture of the late 1960s and early 70s. The most well-known image from CaliforniaTrip is also the most instinctive and intuitive. Shot from behind, his vibrant portrait of a young woman in a cotton dress dancing on stage at a rock festival in Venice Beach in 1968 exudes all the exuberant optimism of the time. This kid just marched up on stage and started dancing, he would later recall, comparing her to a contemporary ballerina and himself to his hero, Henri Cartier-Bresson.

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The hippy dream … Novato, California, 1968. Photograph: Dennis Stock/Magnum Photos

California Trip, though, perhaps owes more to an American tradition of road photography that stretches back to Robert Frank, Walker Evans and beyond. Stocks east coast outsider gaze settles on the darkness of the California dream as well as the light: bikers, anti-war protesters, the disenfranchised as well as the visionary. In one arresting image, a black couple in a parade in Watts, Los Angeles, have created an ornate tableau in which they are chained to the Liberty Bell. An idyllic image of a hippy couple on horseback gives way to a portrait of Anton Szandor LaVey, the self-styled high priest of the Church of Satan, who poses theatrically in front of a pentagram and a human skull.

If there is a thread to be observed throughout my work, Stock later said, its that Im relatively affirmative, Im not inclined to make fools of people and I love beauty. As the reissued California Trip attests, he had an acute eye, too, for the shadows cast by the unforgiving Californian light, the darkness beyond the surface dazzle.

California Trip is out now, reissued by Anthology Editions.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/sep/26/california-trip-how-dennis-stock-caught-the-darkness-beyond-the-hippy-dream

Working as a wildlife photographer seems like the perfect job. You’re always on an adventure, one with nature, tracking and capturing beautiful photographs of majestic creatures. 

Well, 69-year-old wildlife photographer Gren Sowerby from Whitley Bay in Northumberland is living the dream, taking pictures of animals, landscapes, and people in Kenya, Tanzania, Crete, and the United Kingdom. Sowerby’s name recently went viral on the internet because of a burst of photos he took, showing a lion yawning and then smiling and winking at the photographer. The photos are absolutely stunning, so it’s no wonder they captured nearly everyone’s attention.

Scroll down for Sowerby’s interviews with Bored Panda, as well as with SWNS!

More info: GrenSowerby.co.uk | Facebook

Image credits: Gren Sowerby / SWNS

Image credits: Gren Sowerby / SWNS

Image credits: Gren Sowerby / SWNS

Image credits: Gren Sowerby / SWNS

Sowerby told Sophie Finnegan from SWNS that he got the shock of his life as he leaned in to take a photo and the lion let out “a huge roar.” 

“He roared to say: ‘I’m the King of the Jungle’ and then I couldn’t believe it when he smiled at me like when someone winks at you to say like: ‘Haha!’”

“I was probably 10-15 meters away and he was with a lioness, she was crossing a stream. They had a kill in the bushes and I think he let out a roar probably to say that he was full!” Sowerby told SWNS. “I was taken aback by the sheer size and scale of him. From him being very still and quiet then for him to let out a big boom was quite something.”

Sowerby has been a photographer for over 37 years!

Image credits: Gren Sowerby / SWNS

The photo shoot happened last month in Maasai Mara, Kenya. “I was really happy with the photos, I only looked at them properly when I got home. I regularly go on these safaris and really enjoy photographing wildlife. They have grown up around the safari so they’re used to cars and tourists.”

“The King of the Jungle is always something you’ve got to capture and I’m so pleased I got the shot,” Sowerby added.

The photographer has spent the last 37+ years taking pictures of wildlife, landscapes, portraits, as well as live music. Though he started out with a 35mm film camera, he switched over to digital photography back in 2003.

Image credits: Gren Sowerby / SWNS

When contacted by Bored Panda, the photographer revealed more about photographing lions and other wildlife, as well as about what inspires him to keep taking pictures.

“The first thing you need is a good tracker for lions I use a Maasai guide called Ntimama Mpoe. His local knowledge in the  Maasai Mara is amazing,” Sowerby said. “The time of day is important too, they’re much more active early in the morning and evening when they hunt. During the daytime, you will get a sleepy cat! Keep very quiet and try not to disturb them. Give them space and have lots of patience.”

“I started 40 years ago photographing my daughter and I got the bug. It has stayed with me all this time and it’s the thought of getting better images that keeps me going,” the photographer revealed how his love for the art first started. “The new technology is part of it, but mainly it’s to get the perfect image of your subject that makes you happiest.”

What’s more, Sowerby told Bored Panda more details about the lion photo shoot and talked about he maintains his passion for photography. “He had just fed on a kill and was with his lioness. They both went for a drink at the stream, separately, before resting up.”

“The excitement is always there in Africa, so when you approach a pride or something that you are looking for then it all kicks in just like it always has. It’s hard to explain the feeling, as you are excited but at the same time you are trying to concentrate on camera settings and composition!”

“It’s easy to miss a shot in the excitement, just act calm and hopefully it will all come good when you look back through your images!”

Shelby Bercume, a hobbyist animal expert, shared some intriguing lion facts with Bored Panda. Let us know if you’ve heard these ones before and if you know any other awesome facts, dear Pandas.

“Did you know that female lions do all the hunting? They typically live in a group called a pride with one male and they are responsible for feeding the group,” Shelby said.

She continued: “Lions also have the loudest roar and can be heard around 5 miles away. Also, male lions’ manes not only protect their necks but attract their female counterparts.”

People were impressed by the graceful creature’s photos

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/lion-roar-winks-photo-gren-sowerby/

She came on stage with a black silk bag over her head and walked straight into the mic stand. It didnt ruin anything though. The crowd were in raptures

I took this shot of Yoko Ono 14 years ago, in 2005 at Patti Smiths Meltdown, the London festival curated by a different musical icon each year. Ive always been fascinated by Yoko Ono because of the mythos that surrounds her. Shes often referred to as the woman who split up the Beatles, but theres so much more to her than that.

When I saw her on the lineup I was surprised she seemed an odd choice. But she is indisputably one of the strongest women in the music industry, she has such a unique sound. When I saw her name, I had to go.

That festival was one of the best Meltdowns there has ever been, and Onos performance was electrifying. I was perched right in front of centre stage and the anticipation was palpable. The audience was full of different people: lifelong fans, Beatles obsessives, a newer avant garde crowd and a load of celebrities too. As we waited I felt like I was in church the reverence the crowd had for her was overwhelming.

The lights went down and a short film was projected on to a silk screen hanging across the stage. It was transfixing. In one scene, a person walks towards the camera, getting closer and closer, and then at a certain point, the figure in the film became real, on stage, in front of us. Yoko had a slit made in the screen which she came through at the very moment that the figure in the projection was the right size, so it looked like art made life. Everyone was completely taken aback.

At the time, she was still interested in bagism a practice she and Lennon engaged in as a way to deindividualise speakers and emphasise their message by wearing a nondescript bag over their heads. So she came out with this black silk bag obscuring her vision, and walked straight into the mic stand. It didnt ruin anything though. The crowd were in raptures.

In a split second when I managed to take my eyes off her, I realised that Sean Lennon, her and Johns son, was standing in the background bathed in red light. It was utterly spooky. He was the absolute spit of his father, wearing the same glasses with long hair it was like a vision on stage.

I was so transfixed that I almost missed this shot. Only when I took my eyes off Sean did I see Yoko directly above me, leaning over the stage with the power and energy you can see in the photo. I had one chance, and I managed to get the shot.

The photo made an impact: it was the photograph that got me working with the Rock Archives, countless people have messaged me about it, and I believe Yoko herself bought a copy. But its funny, because I dont necessarily rate it as one of my best. I think thats a quirk of photographers: the work they really rate isnt often the one that resonates with people the most.

But I think the image speaks to her power. At the time of this performance, she was around 71, and shes small. But she should never be underestimated: when she speaks, people listen. When she performs, people watch. You can feel her presence. I think its what makes her such an icon.

Mark
Mark Mawston. Photograph: Mark Mawston

Mark Mawstons CV

Born: Newcastle upon Tyne, 1966.

Training: No formal training.

Influences: William Claxton, Linda McCartney, Mick Rock, Annie Leibovitz. The first images that made me want to pick up a camera though were shots of reflections in a glass building that my grandfather took in Newcastle.

High point: Being one of the first music photographers to give a talk at the O2s British Music Experience along with Jill Furmanovskyand Phillip Mr Sixties Townsend.

Low point: Meeting an out-of-sorts Sean Connery. However, I did walk away with a wonderful piece of advice: If youre gonna be schmaartt, be shmaarrttaa and hes still a hero of mine.

Top tip: Even if youre in a crowd in the pit in front of stage, try and do something different. Do what youre not supposed to and enjoy every moment.

Nile Rodgers Meltdown festival is at the Southbank Centre, London, until 11 August.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/aug/08/mark-mawston-best-photograph-yoko-ono

The punks were sceptical of my presence. One guy even headbutted me. In retrospect, I think it was a sign of acceptance

I was in my mid-20s when Cornell Capa, director of the International Center of Photography in New York, recommended me for a job documenting life in the American sector of Berlin while the city was still divided. As a young photographer, I was so nervous. All of these senior German officials were swanning around my studio inspecting my work.

I blurted out that I wasnt American, that I was born in Canada, almost like a confession. I felt I had to tell them. They just looked at me quizzically, laughed and started speaking in German. I have no idea what they thought of me. But I got the job.

I went to West Berlin in 1982 to document what was called Mauerkrankheit, which roughly translates as wall sickness. It was a disorder, identified in Berlin, caused by the fact that youre living in this divided city, surrounded by the tension between the Soviet and American sectors. Its a slow-motion trauma that culminates in depression. I heard that nearly 10% of people living in the east were diagnosed with it.

In the west, I discovered a different side to the disorder. Every Saturday, punks would hang out, drink beer and blare music through their soundsystems. Cars would be set alight and bank windows smashed in. The cops would arrive, teargas them and send them running to find shelter in nearby bars, and the whole cycle would repeat. They were sceptical of me to begin with. One guy even headbutted me. In retrospect, I think that was a sign of acceptance.

Getting to know them wasnt easy, and it happened in the strangest of ways. I would carry a bunch of bananas to snack on while I wandered the streets. When I found the punks, I didnt know what to say, so I offered them bananas. They just laughed at me. But they must have liked it, because they welcomed me into their crew.

As I got to know them, I realised they fitted into the idea of the wall sickness, but they were the manic side of the depression that reigned in the east. There was something psychotic about punk at the time. These werent just weekend punks and punk wasnt just a look this was their life.

The woman in this shot was called Miriam, and the rat on her shoulder is called Bestia. It was a week or so before Reagan was planning to visit, and there were windows smashed all over the city in protest. Despite the violence and the militancy, she was extremely gentle. She was big, much bigger than me, but she had a soft way of gesturing and moving.

She invited me to her place, a nearby squat. We hung out, drank tea, took some shots and became friends. She introduced me to her rat, Bestia, who lived in her oven. Being a squat, it had no electricity, so it was perfectly safe. Bestia was almost like a guardian angel for Miriam, keeping her safe amid the anarchy. I think it was useful to keep guys off her back, too nobodys messing when you have a rat draped around your neck.

People feel this image represents a moment in Berlins history, or the punk movement more broadly, but to me its a shot of someone I got to know, who welcomed me into a hard-to-reach scene. It was a doorway for me into other activist and protest scenes, and I remember the time fondly.

People seem to think that punk has died, and maybe elements of the aesthetic have. But the spirit of punk was so much more than a look, and I think that lives on, albeit in different forms. I think we saw it in the Occupy movement, within elements of the Arab spring, and I think we are seeing it today in the UK with Extinction Rebellion.

Philip Pococks CV

Philip
Photograph: Heike Borowski

Born: Ottawa, Canada, 1954.

Training: Film and television production, New York University.

Influences: Diane Arbus, Brassa, the Capa brothers, Eikoh Hosoe, Andr Kertsz, Dorothea Lange, Helen Levitt, Mary Ellen Mark, Lszl Moholy-Nagy, Gordon Parks, Thomas Ruff, Aaron Siskind, Francesca Woodman.

High point: My 1997 Documenta X commission, Germany.

Low point: A life-changing accident on a film set in 1979.

Top tip: Draw with your eyes. Think like a writer. Earn trust and befriend!

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/jul/31/philip-pocock-best-photograph-miriam-berlin-punk-and-her-rat-bestia

He photographed the biggest stars on Earth but Bowie was his favourite. He recalls the stars irresistible charm, his most outlandish outfits and his druggiest shoot

From Audrey Hepburn to the Beatles, Frank Sinatra and Elton John, there arent many pop cultural icons Terry ONeill hasnt photographed. One of his subjects, Hollywood actress Faye Dunaway who he famously captured hungover, surrounded by newspapers the morning after winning an Oscar in 1977 became his wife, even if the memory now frustrates him. He agrees that a photographer falling in love with one of their subjects is rarely a good idea: That was a waste of 12 years of my life!

Yet the legendary photographer insists none of these stars compared to David Bowie. He was my creative muse, ONeill tells me authoritatively over the phone. He was so charming and warm, and one of the few people [other than Faye] I really felt friendly towards.

The
The flash startled the dog a session for the Diamond Dogs album. Photograph: Terry ONeill/Iconic Images

Currently suffering from prostate cancer, ONeill is confined to bed and admits that hes severely lacking in energy. But the mention of Bowie will occasionally cause the 81-year-olds hoarse cockney drawl to soften and lighten up with enthusiasm.

I treated David like a Shakespearean actor as you never knew who was going to show up, he says affectionately. He could look alien-like or female-like; it was always so exciting as everything he did was so unpredictable.

Over a 20-year period, ONeill captured Bowies shapeshifting artistry better than just about anybody else, standing behind the camera as the Space Oddity singer transformed into theatrical glam avatar Ziggy Stardust, then morphed into the coke-addled Thin White Duke, who in 1976 notoriously told Rolling Stones Cameron Crowe: I think I might have been a bloody good Hitler. Id be an excellent dictator. Although, ONeill claims: I dont actually remember him saying that stuff.

His last magazine shoot with Bowie in 1992 was shot like a sentimental happy ending, with ONeills warm closeups giving off the impression he was delighted the star had managed to make it out of the 1970s alive. It felt like we had come full circle, he agrees.

ONeills photographs have left such a lasting impression because he was able to demystify some of the 20th centurys biggest icons and cut to the core of their personalities. His photographs of Audrey Hepburn, for example, went beyond the clichs of her delicate beauty and prioritised her goofy side, as she pulled silly faces while relaxing by the pool.

The imperious strength of Winston Churchill, meanwhile, is something ONeill ripped into pieces. Instead, we saw a frail old man who was admirably trying to keep up the illusion of the cigar-munching British Bulldog despite the fact he had become so weak he had to be carried around in a chair by minders. It was 1962 and I was going home from the office and saw this crowd forming, he recalls. I burst my way through it to take a photograph and it was Churchill leaving the hospital. I didnt really know his whole story so I just shot what was in front of me. The fact I didnt have any emotional baggage maybe helped.

Farewell
Farewell Ziggy Stardusts final outing, for an NBC late-night show in London, 1973. Photograph: Terry ONeill/Iconic Images

Three years earlier, ONeill had started working at the Daily Sketch, becoming one of the youngest photographers on Fleet Street. I wanted to be just like W Eugene Smith, who was such a great photojournalist. His images were full of truth. One of the first important gigs he can remember taking on was photographing Laurence Olivier dressed as a woman for a performance at the London variety show The Night of a Hundred Stars; perfect training for the gender fluidity of Bowie that would await him later on. There was a 12-year-age gap between me and the next youngest photographer, he recalls.

According to ONeill, nobody in Fleet Street wanted to interact with the youth scene and its emerging bands, such as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. This left him with an opportunity to capture the swinging 60s with real freedom. I remember I was asked by an editor to go photograph this little band called the Beatles at Abbey Road Studios, then that led to me working with the Stones, says ONeill. All the old timers didnt want to take these photographs on and almost looked down on them. It meant us youngsters could jump in and take up the opportunity. I could go out and create my own world. There was no other time like it; it was just so much fun!

By the time ONeill started shooting Bowie during his Ziggy Stardust tour in 1973, he was much more of a respected name in the photography world. But while he had taken important concert photographs before, ONeill was able to enjoy these ones a lot more. You couldnt bloody hear the Beatles, he explains, but Bowies show actually entertained you and had a story to it. I could hear every word and he really gave you a proper show.

Scantily clad in fishnets and monster claws over his chest, rocking a garishly orange mullet, Bowies on-stage bravery during this era impressed ONeill, especially the way he wasnt afraid to look effeminate at a time where this could get you beaten up. Most of all, he liked the fact that Bowie took charge of his own image during their sessions, particularly for their Diamond Dogs shoot, where the singer had a specific, animalistic, bare-chested pose in mind. He also brought a dog on to the set, which jumped up in shock at the flash of the strobe lighting, perfectly capturing the kind of avant garde chaos Bowie had intended for his dystopian album, influenced by George Orwells 1984.

A
A contact sheet from the Diamond Dogs shoot. Photograph: Terry ONeill/Iconic Images

I loved that he had all these characters and took charge of our sessions and told me exactly what he wanted, says ONeill. It meant that our pictures had a purpose. I guess with most of the other pop stars I shot, it was sometimes very aimless. With David, you never had to coax things out, they just came naturally.

Yet just a year later, during a shoot for the Los Angeles Magazine, ONeill could almost be photographing a different person Bowie appears gaunt and looks like he hasnt been sleeping. There was a lot of cocaine all of a sudden, admits ONeill. He was really big on drugs. I never felt I was in a position to have a word with him about it as dont forget: we were all around the same age!

One of ONeills most famous Bowie shots co-stars a fellow countercultural hero. One day he told me, Come to my office tomorrow, Im bringing someone special. I got there and it was William Burroughs, and I was completely staggered. They were both dressed in fedora hats like father and son, he giggles. Was that the Naked Lunch authors idea? No, David decided on that.

Im
Im bringing someone special with William Burroughs for Rolling Stone in February, 1974. Photograph: Terry ONeill/Terry O’Neill

Around this period, ONeill heard that Elizabeth Taylor was hoping to cast Bowie in her new movie Blue Bird, so engineered a shoot between the pair. But Bowie, who was by this stage doing lines of coke for breakfast, showed up four hours late. It was only because of Lizs professionalism that the shoot even happened, he reflects. David showed up stoned out of his head. In these photographs, Taylor looks bemused at being left waiting for so long, as Bowie hugs her apologetically.

Yet as the shoot went on, Taylor thawed and Bowie began holding her more and more affectionately. By the end of the day, they looked more like lovers than acquaintances. With his charm, Bowie could always affect women, says ONeill, and thats what happened on that day. But Liz never gave him the part in the movie, which I guess was telling.

David
David showed up stoned out of his head with Liz Taylor in 1975. Photograph: Terry ONeill/Iconic Images

Bowie was never anything other than interesting, according to ONeill, who insists that modern pop stars are pampered and manufactured. He believes theyre nowhere near as interesting as the people he was fortunate enough to photograph. When I ask him if hed be excited to shoot a modern star like Beyonc, he dismissively replies: Definitely not. I dont care about pop stars any more. Theres nobody I want to photograph so Ive lost interest to be honest. There are no great pop singers like Elton John. The new acts just arent as interesting to look at. When Frank Sinatra and all of those guys died, it was awful. It really felt like the end of an era.

I
I dont care about pop stars any more Terry ONeill today. Photograph: Terry O’Neill

He hopes his new book, Bowie by ONeill, will help a new generation of fans connect with the singer, with the photographs also helping spark memories of a period the photographer admits is now more than a little hazy. ONeill, who was awarded an honorary fellowship from the Royal Photographic Society back in 2004, sounds genuinely humbled that hes still being asked to reflect on these photographs.

At the time, I just carried on taking pictures. When I worked with Frank [Sinatra] he told me to be a fly on the wall and thats what I was. I never realised that these photos would live on for as long as they did, he says. Bowies name is going to live on forever and if, by extension, that means my photographs do too, then thats a really incredible thought.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/aug/06/terry-oneill-best-bowie-shoots-david-never-needed-coaxing